Connect with us

Houston Astros

Hall Of Fame Umpire Doug “God” Harvey Dies At Age 87

Published

on

Former Major League umpire Doug Harvey died on Saturday due to natural causes in Visalia, California while in hospice care; he was 87 years old.

Harvey is one of 10 umpires in the MLB Hall of Fame and the second most recent to be inducted (2010).

According to MLB.com’s Ben Weinrib, Harvey’s 4,673 total games worked during his 31 years as a National League umpire ranks fifth most of all-time; it was also the third most at the time of his retirement in 1992.

Harvey was a crew chief for 18 of his 31 seasons umpired.

Known as “God” by players and managers throughout his career, Harvey was named the second greatest umpire of all-time in 1999 by the Society for American Baseball Research.

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said the following in a statement:

“Hall of Famer Doug Harvey was one of the most accomplished umpires of all-time. Known for his strong presence and communication skills, he umpired some of the most memorable moments ever, including from behind the plate for Kirk Gibson’s walk-off home run to open the 1988 World Series. A generation of umpires learned as a result of Doug’s example, his eagerness to teach the game and his excellent timing behind the plate.

“On behalf of Major League Baseball, I send my deepest condolences to Doug’s family, his friends and the umpiring community.”

Hall of Fame president Jeff Idelson issued a statement of his own:

“Doug Harvey set the bar for future umpires. He was revered for his calm demeanor, ability to control the game, knowledge of the strike zone and comprehension of the rules, leading many players to refer to him as ‘god.’ He umpired with integrity, heart and common sense for 31 seasons, including 18 as a crew chief, resulting in his richly deserved 2010 election into the Hall of Fame.”

Harvey was the home plate umpire in Game 1 of 1988’s World Series, best known as the Kirk Gibson game. That series marked one of five Fall Classics that Harvey umpired; he also took part in six All-Star games.

Another fun fact about Harvey is that the first player he ever ejected in a game was Joe Torre in 1962.

Rest in peace, Doug!

American League

Astros’ Joe Smith Undergoes Surgery For Torn Achilles Tendon

Published

on

Houston Astros right hander Joe Smith has undergone surgery for a ruptured Achilles tendon in his left leg, the team announced on Thursday (h/t the Houston Chronicle).

Smith, 34, is set to earn $8 million for the 2019 season, which is the 2nd year of a two year pact he inked with Houston.

Continue Reading

American League

Astros Sign Robinson Chirinos to One-Year Deal

Published

on

The Houston Astros are signing free agent catcher Robinson Chirinos to a one-year deal with $5.75 million, according to The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal.

Chirinos had a career year in 2017 while playing for the Texas Rangers, but had a dramatic dip in production during the 2018 season and was no brought back by the team. Chirinos isn’t considered a defensive stud behind the plate either, and will join Max Stassi in the Astros catching rotation.

 

Continue Reading

American League

Astros Reportedly Make Offer to Charlie Morton

Published

on

The Houston Astros are reportedly interested in retaining one of their own, making an initial offer to right hander Charlie Morton, according to USA Today Sports’ Bob Nightengale.

Houston surprisingly declined to make a qualifying offer recently, and according to the report the Astros made a one-year offer to Morton with an option for the second year.

Morton, 35, did say that he would love to return to Houston this season.

Continue Reading

Trending